’Pig’ British tourists to be deported from New Zealand after theft, littering, not paying for food

0
66
Scientists reveal 'ideal diet' for peoples' and planet's health LONDON, (Reuters) - Scientists have unveiled what they say is an ideal diet for the health of the planet and its people - including a doubling of consumption of nuts, fruits, vegetables and legumes, and a halving of meat and sugar intake. If the world followed the "Planetary Health" diet, the researchers said, more than 11 million premature deaths could be prevented each year, while greenhouse gas emissions would be cut and more land, water and biodiversity would be preserved. "The food we eat and how we produce it determines the health of people and the planet, and we are currently getting this seriously wrong," said Tim Lang, a professor at Britain's University of London who co-led the research. Feeding a growing population of 10 billion people by 2050 with a healthy, sustainable diet will be impossible without transforming eating habits, improving food production and reducing food waste, he said. "We need a significant overhaul, changing the global food system on a scale not seen before." The proposed planetary diet is the result of a three-year project commissioned by The Lancet health journal and involving 37 specialists from 16 countries. It says global average consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar should be cut by 50 percent, while consumption of nuts, fruits, vegetables and legumes should double. For individual regions, this could mean even more dramatic changes: People in North America, for example, eat almost 6.5 times the recommended amount of red meat, while people in South Asia eat only half the amount suggested by the planetary diet. Meeting the targets for starchy vegetables such as potatoes and cassava would need big changes in sub-Saharan Africa, where people on average eat 7.5 times the suggested amount. Presenting the diet at a briefing on Wednesday, the researchers said they acknowledged it was very ambitious to hope to get everyone in the world to adopt it, not least because there is vast global inequality of access to food. "More than 800 million people have insufficient food, while many more consume an unhealthy diet that contributes to premature death and disease," said Walter Willett of Harvard University in the United States. "If we can't quite make it, it's better to try and get as close as we can," he said.

WELLINGTON (AFP): Members of a British family have been branded “worse than pigs” and face deportation from New Zealand after a spree of bad behaviour that left normally easygoing Kiwis outraged.

The family have been involved in a string of incidents in and around Auckland and Hamilton, including accusations of littering, assault, not paying for restaurant meals and intimidating behaviour.

Auckland mayor Phil Goff led national outcry at the tourists’ antics, demanding the police take action.

“These guys are trash. They are leeches,” he told a local radio station.

“They’re worse than pigs and I’d like to see them out of the country.”

New Zealand’s assistant general manager of immigration, Peter Devoy, said the family had been issued with a deportation notice on the grounds of “matters relating to character”.

One 26-year-old member of the family on Wednesday (Jan 16) pleaded guilty to stealing NZ$55 (RM151) worth of goods from a petrol station.

The family attracted extensive media coverage in New Zealand after a video showed them leaving beer boxes, bottles and other rubbish strewn on a popular beach.

When a woman asked them to clean up their litter, a child in the group can be seen on video threatening he would “knock your brains out”.

Stuff Media reported that one family member hit a journalist with her shoe after being approached for comment.

A member of the family told the New Zealand Herald they have now decided to cut short their holiday and will return home this week.

John Johnson insisted his family were of good stock, claimed his grandfather was the “10th richest man in England” and said he was made to feel “very unwelcome” in New Zealand. – AFP